• Photo: Anthon Frederiksen, Gustaf Lind, and Mike Gill presented the ASTI report at the event.

    ASTI media event at IPY inspires articles

    On Monday April 23 The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) working group hosted a media event to present the updated version of the Arctic Species Trend Index (ASTI) to journalists attending the conference.

  • The CBMP receives GEO BON endorsement

    The Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP), the cornerstone program of the  Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) working group, received official endorsement from the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON) in January 2012. CBMP now belongs to the GEO BON regional network Arctic-BON. Arctic-BON is one of five regional networks. The other four are AP BON (which includes ASEAN CB), F-BON (France/ECOSOPE), EBONE (Europe), and J-BON (Japan).

  • Arctic Trends and the ABA

    The Arctic Biodiversity Assessment (ABA) was endorsed by the Arctic Council in 2006. The aims of the ABA are to provide a much needed description of the current state of the Arctic’s ecosystems and biodiversity, create a baseline for use in global and regional assessments of biodiversity, and provide a basis to inform and guide future Arctic Council work.

  • Walrus Photo by Peter Prokosch / GRID-Arendal

    CAFF Works with the CBD on Arctic biodiversity

     In a guest article for the Biodiversity Policy and Practice website, Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) working group Executive Secretary Tom Barry outlines the work that CAFF is doing to support Arctic biodiversity. As Barry states in his article, some of this work is being done in conjunction with the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)

  • Walrus observed in water by tourists in boat

    Marine biodiversity

    With a warming climate, marine biodiversity faces a number of challenges. In order to understand these changes in marine ecosystems, the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) has responded in a number of ways.

  • Hand holding algae sample

    Community Based Monitoring

    The peoples inhabiting the various regions of the Arctic spend vast amounts of time on the land and at sea. Drawing on personal experience, information shared with others, and knowledge handed down through the generations, residents of the Arctic are able to recognize subtle environmental changes and offer insights into their causes.

  • CAFF logo


    The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna's assessments provide vital descriptions of the current state of Arctic biodiversity. These efforts create scientific baselines which inform regional and global assessments, and provide a basis to guide future Arctic Council work.

  • Joseph Culp sampling freshwater benthos via kick net. Photo by Daryl Halliwell, Environment Canada


    Learn more about The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna's Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program (CBMP), an international network of scientists, government agencies, Indigenous organizations and conservation groups working together to harmonize and integrate monitoring efforts and data collection.

  • CAFF Report Presented

    At the CBD-COP10 meeting in Nagoya, Japan, the Arctic Council’s Working Group on Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) held a side event presenting its report: “Arctic Biodiversity Trends 2010: Selected Indicators of Change”. The report is the first output of the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment (ABA), of which results will be launched in 2013.

  • Walrus resting on ice sheet

    The State of the Arctic 2009

    The Arctic Report Cards are a timely source of clear, reliable and concise information on the state of the Arctic. The 2009 Arctic Report Cards was released last week.

  • Image of a walrus in ice landscape

    Effects of Sea-ice Loss on Biodiversity

    Thirty scientists, managers and community experts met in Vancouver, Canada, with the purpose to develop a technical report on what effects sea-ice reduction has on biodiversity in the Arctic. The Arctic Council Working Group on Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF), organized and managed the workshop.

  • Image of a polar bear

    Monitoring Polar Bears

    On 19-22 February 2011, twenty-two scientists, managers and community experts from Canada, Greenland, Norway, Russia and the United States, met in Edmonton, Canada, to develop a Pan-Arctic Monitoring Plan for Polar Bears.