Thematic Work

News Articles

  • A view of Whitehorse in the Yukon Territory of Canada where the upcoming SAO meeting will be held.

    Media Advisory: Arctic Council Senior Arctic Officials Meeting to Take Place in Whitehorse

    Patrick Borbey, chair of Senior Arctic Officials, will hold a media availability on October 23 on the results of the plenary meeting of the Senior Arctic Officials. Media representatives are also invited to attend a public outreach event held by the Arctic Council and its biodiversity working group, CAFF, in partnership with the Government of Yukon and the Yukon Science Institute.

  • Photo: Kristin Nymark Heggland. "Ice Floating".

    IPCC report aligns with Arctic Council scientific work and action

    The UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a new report - Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis - on September 27th, 2013. Many scientists from Arctic Council members contributed to this IPCC report, and the findings have informed the Council’s climate change related work, notably in guiding further scientific efforts and in adaptation actions important to Northern communities.

  • Arctic Council States welcome Minamata Convention on Mercury

    The Minamata Convention, a global agreement “to protect human health and the environment from anthropogenic emissions and releases of mercury and mercury compounds,” will be opened for signature in Minamata, Japan from October 9-11. The Arctic Council States and Permanent Participant organizations welcome the new agreement, recognizing that the Council’s scientific work has contributed greatly to global understanding of mercury pollution.

  • The main street of Whitehorse features stores and restaurants.

    Whitehorse, the Wilderness City

    The city of Whitehorse is located on the banks of the Yukon River in south-western Yukon, an hour and half from Kluane National Park, home of Mount Logan, Canada’s highest mountain. Whitehorse was an important river and railway hub for prospectors during the Klondike Gold Rush of 1898 and was named for the white “manes” of the nearby river rapids close to a former First Nations salmon fishing site.

  • The Lapporten mountain range in winter, cover photo from the Kiruna Declaration. (Photo: Karin Nylund)

    Illustrated versions of Kiruna documents available

    The Kiruna Declaration, The Arctic Council’s Vision for the Arctic, and the Kiruna Senior Arctic Officials’ Report to Ministers were approved by the Arctic Ministers in Kiruna 15 May 2013. The documents have now been formatted and illustrated with photos from the Arctic. These new versions are available for download from the website and in hard copy from the Arctic Council Secretariat.

  • "After the Eruption" - Inga Vitola - Creative Commons BY - http://flic.kr/p/dRFNfH

    The Task Force for Action on Black Carbon and Methane

    When the Arctic Council’s Task Force for Action on Black Carbon and Methane (TFBCM) met in Whitehorse, Yukon on 17-19 September, the discussion focused on the health and climate benefits that would follow from reduction of black carbon and methane emissions in the Arctic.

  • Bubbles / proudcanadianeh on Flickr / CC BY

    Arctic Council seeks to understand and reduce SLCFs such as methane

    recent paper in the journal Nature on the potential costs to the global economy of methane release in the Arctic garnered many headlines and ignited significant debate on this important environmental issue. Short-lived climate pollutants such as black carbon, ozone, and methane contribute to global warming. Sustained reductions in short-lived climate pollutants can help slow the rate of warming, globally and in sensitive regions such as the Arctic.

  • From left to right: Tom Barry, CAFF Secretariat, Miiti Lynge Minister for Housing, Nature and the Environment, Greenland, Inge Thaulow, Special Advisor, Greenlandic Government, Tobias Salathe, Ramsar Secretariat.

    Arctic Wetlands in a Time of Change

    Last week in Ilulissat, Greenland, the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) Working Group of the Arctic Council provided an Arctic perspective to the Nordic-Baltic Wetlands Initiative (NorBalWet) conference, a regional initiative under the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, to discuss northern wetlands and climate change.

  • September 2, 2013 - Oslo, Norway - The Honourable Leona Aglukkaq, Minister for the Arctic Council, Minister of the Environment, and Minister of the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, delivers remarks on Canada’s Arctic Council Chairmanship at the Gjøa Wing of the Fram Museum. / ЛЕОНА АГЛУККАК, МИНИСТР, ПРЕДСТАВЛЯЮЩИЙ КАНАДУ В АРКТИЧЕСКОМ СОВЕТЕ.

    Minister Aglukkaq Speaks on Canada’s Arctic Council Chairmanship

    Canada and Norway have a long history of collaboration on Arctic issues. In June 2013, a new wing of the Fram Museum opened to house the Gjøa, the ship used by Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen to navigate the waterways known as the “Northwest Passage.” Amundsen became trapped in the ice off King William Island, in a remote area of Nunavut, now called Gjoa Haven.

  • Aerial view of Reykjavik where the PAME workshops were held. (Photo: Bryan Pocius/Flickr) / РЕЙКЬЯВИК,  МЕСТО ПРОВЕДЕНИЯ РАБОЧИХ СОВЕЩАНИЙ PAME, С ВЫСОТЫ ПТИЧЬЕГО ПОЛЁТА (ФОТО: БРАЙАН ПОCИУС)

    Three PAME workshops on the Arctic marine environment

    During the week of 10-14 June, 2013, the Arctic Council’s Working Group on Protection of the Arctic Marine Environment (PAME) convened three workshops in Reykjavík, Iceland to advance work as directed by the Arctic Council Ministers in Kiruna and outlined in PAME‘s 2013-2015 workplan.  

  • Example of a storage facility for obsolete pesticides in the Russian Arctic. (Photo: ACAP) / ПРИМЕР ХРАНИЛИЩА ДЛЯ УСТАРЕВШИХ ПЕСТИЦИДОВ В РОССИЙСКОЙ АРКТИКЕ. (ФОТО: ACAP)

    New ACAP fact sheet on obsolete pesticides in the Arctic

    Obsolete pesticides pose a risk to human health and the environment locally and globally. Many pesticides are found in the Arctic as a result of long-range transport in the atmosphere and water. The Arctic environment and indigenous peoples are often at greater risk of exposure to contaminants because of changing climate conditions and local dietary habits. An ACAP fact sheet on obsolete pesticides was approved at the Kiruna Ministerial 15 May 2013.

  • The sea outside the Lofoten Islands in Northern Norway (Photo: Linnea Nordström) / МОРЕ В РАЙОНЕ ЛОФОТЕНСКИХ ОСТРОВОВ, СЕВЕРНАЯ НОРВЕГИЯ (ФОТО: ЛИННЕА НОРДСТРЁМ)

    Arctic Ocean Review demonstrates Arctic Council stewardship efforts of the Arctic marine environment

    Arctic marine areas are vital components in the regulation of global climate and an important source of nutrition, income and cultural identity for Arctic peoples and communities. At the May 2013 Ministerial meeting in Kiruna, Arctic Council Ministers welcomed the Arctic Ocean Review (AOR) Final Report and approved its 24 recommendations.

  • HOLE in an iceberg near the village of KEKERTAT IN NORTHWEST GREENLAND (PHOTO: RAYMOND Moloney) / ОТВЕРСТИЕ В АЙСБЕРГЕ НЕДАЛЕКО ОТ ДЕРЕВНИ КЕКЕРТАТ НА СЕВЕРО-ЗАПАДЕ ГРЕНЛАНДИИ (ФОТО: РЭЙМОНД МОЛОНИ)

    Assessment of Arctic Ocean Acidification studies seawater pH

    The Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) working group has released the first ever comprehensive assessment of Arctic Ocean acidification. The assessment was approved at the Ministerial Meeting in Kiruna 15 May 2013. In the Kiruna declaration Ministers welcomed the assessment and also requested that Arctic States continue to take action on mitigation and adaptation as well as continue to monitor and assess the state of Arctic Ocean acidification.

  • The coast of Bleik, Andøy in Northern Norway (Photo: Tommy Larsen) / ПОБЕРЕЖЬЕ В РАЙОНЕ СЕЛЕНИЯ БЛЕЙК, АННЁЙ, СЕВЕРНАЯ НОРВЕГИЯ (ФОТО: ТОММИ ЛАРСЕН)

    Educational film on ocean acidification in the Arctic

    The Arctic Ocean Acidification (AOA) assessment, approved at the Kiruna Ministerial Meeting 15 May 2013, is the latest report by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP). The assessment reviews the current state of knowledge regarding ocean acidification from an Arctic perspective. Two short films have been prepared to present the content of the report in an accessible form.

  • Workshop participants engrossed in discussions during the workshop. / УЧАСТНИКИ СОВЕЩАНИЯ ПОГЛОЩЕНЫ ДИСКУССИЕЙ.

    Workshop on reducing Black Carbon emissions from residential wood combustion

    The Norwegian Climate and Pollution Agency and the Finnish Environment Institute hosted an Arctic Contaminants Action program (ACAP) working group workshop in Oslo on 18th and 19th of June 2013. The workshop was organized as part of the midpoint status review of the ACAP project on reduction of black carbon emissions from residential wood combustion.

  • King Carl XVI Gustav and Queen Silvia on the main street of Tromso.King Carl XVI Gustav and Queen Silvia on the main street of Tromsø (Photo: Kungahuset.se) / КОРОЛЬ ШВЕЦИИ КАРЛ XVI ГУСТАВ И КОРОЛЕВА СИЛЬВИЯ НА ГЛАВНОЙ УЛИЦЕ ТРОМСЁ. (ФОТО: KUNGAHUSET.SE)

    Briefing for Swedish and Norwegian royal couples on the work of the Arctic Council

    Last week on the 19 June, His Majesty King Karl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden were on an official visit to Tromsø, Norway along with His Majesty King Harald V and Queen Sonja. The royal visit program included a briefing on climate change in the Arctic, the ongoing work of the Arctic Council, and acidification of the Arctic Ocean.

  • Reindeer and power plant (Photo:Bruce Forbes) / ОЛЕНИ И ЭЛЕКТРОСТАНЦИЯ (ФОТО: БРЮС ФОРБС)

    Reporting on the Resilience of Arctic Ecosystems

    The Arctic Resilience Interim Report released on 15 May, finds that rapid – even abrupt – changes are occurring on multiple fronts across the Arctic, raising the risk of crossing thresholds that would cause irreversible changes to ecosystems, environmental processes, and societies. The report marks the half-way point in the project that aims to identify critical thresholds and sources of resilience in the face of environmental and social pressures.

  • Patrick Borbey, Canada's SAO Chair.

    Video interview with Patrick Borbey: Some hopes and priorities for the Canadian Chairmanship

    Chair of the Arctic Council Senior Arctic Officials' Patrick Borbey speaks briefly about some of the hopes and priorities for the Canadian Chairmanship 2013-2015.

  • The Canadian Chairmanship Team met with the Arctic Council Secretariat staff in Tromsø this week. / ВСТРЕЧА КОМАНДЫ ПРЕДСЕДАТЕЛЬСТВА КАНАДЫ С СОТРУДНИКАМИ СЕКРЕТАРИАТА АРКТИЧЕСКОГО СОВЕТА В ТРОМСЁ НА ЭТОЙ НЕДЕЛЕ

    SAO Chair Patrick Borbey visits Tromsø and the Arctic Council Secretariat

    Chair of the Senior Arctic Official’s Patrick Borbey visited Tromsø, Norway early this week along with part of the Canadian Chairmanship team. The visit enabled the Canadian Chairmanship team to establish working routines for the chairmanship period 2013-2015 together with the newly established Arctic Council Secretariat.

  • Disturbance and habitat degradation can diminish Arctic biodiversity says the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment report. (Photo: Lars Holst Hansen/ARC-PIC.com) / БИОРАЗНООБРАЗИЕ АРКТИКИ МОЖЕТ УМЕНЬШИТСЯ ИЗ-ЗА ВМЕШАТЕЛЬСТВА ВНЕШНИХ ФАКТОРОВ И ДЕГРАДАЦИИ СРЕДЫ ОБИТАНИЯ (ФОТО: ЛАРС ХОЛЬСТ ХАНСЕН/ ARC-PIC.COM)

    Award-winning CAFF film on Arctic biodiversity

    The film "Status and Trends in Arctic Biodiversity" addresses current biodiversity issues in the Arctic, and ongoing pressures on its ecosystems. It highlights key issues that surfaced in the Arctic Biodiversity Assessment. The film is a collaborative work of the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) working group and UNEP GRID-Arendal.