The peoples inhabiting the various regions of the Arctic spend vast amounts of time on the land and at sea. Drawing on personal experience, information shared with others, and knowledge handed down through the generations, residents of the Arctic are able to recognize subtle environmental changes and offer insights into their causes.

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The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna's assessments provide vital descriptions of the current state of Arctic biodiversity. These efforts create scientific baselines which inform regional and global assessments, and provide a basis to guide future Arctic Council work.

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Language not only communicates, it defines culture, nature, history, humanity, and ancestry [1]. The indigenous languages of the Arctic have been formed and shaped in close contact with their environment. They are a valuable source of information and a wealth of knowledge on human interactions with nature is encoded in these languages. If a language is lost, a world is lost.

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